Volume 2.11 (March 11-17)

Pick of the Week – Reinventing the Airline Industry (Jude Gomila)– I wish I could have thought of half of this stuff.  Scratch that– I would be happy if even 1/10 of these things came to pass.  I think the conclusion nails it– the airline industry essentially stopped innovating in the 1960s.  Their basic corporate orientation is that their business is getting a plane from one place to another, where the passengers are incidental and could just as easily be cargo.  They need to think of themselves as a business for moving people from one place to another, where the plane is only an instrument.

I’m not Catholic, but I can acknowledge that, no matter what faith (if any) you follow, the Pope still has an enormous influence for good (or ill).  From what I have heard and learned about this man, I am hopeful that he can be an instrument in bringing society and religion back from the brink of materialism and the Prosperity Gospel and towards a more Christ-centered message focused on the poor.

Politics

Smaller States Find Outsize Clout Growing in Senate (Adam Liptak, NYT)

In the South and West, a Tax on Being Poor (Katherine S. Newman, NYT)

What millionaires moving to save on taxes says about them, and us (Neil Irwin, Wonkblog)

Arizona Border Quiets After Gains in Security (Julia Preston, NYT)

The American Mind (Sam Tanenhaus, The Prospect)– On Garry Wills, one of my favorite political writers.

Rob Portman, Gay Marriage and Selfishness (Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer)

Detained immigrants deserve human treatment (Edwidge Danticat, WaPo)

International

Is Any Hope Left for Mideast Peace? (Rashid, Khalidi, NYT)

Education

Better Colleges Failing to Lure Talented Poor (David Leonhardt, NYT)

Does Affirmative Action Do What it Should? (Dan Slater, NYT)

College is more than a ‘return on investment’ (Gene Block, WaPo)

Culture

Toward a Complex, Realistic and Moral Tech Criticism (Alexis C. Madrigal, The Atlantic)

Defining Bullying Down (Emily Bazelon, NYT)

Making (and Dismantling) Racism (Jamelle Bouie)

I Was a Teenage Mother (Gloria Malone, NYT)

Economics

Reinventing the Airline Industry (Jude Gomila)– I wish I could have thought of half of this stuff.  Scratch that– I would be happy if even 1/10 of these things came to pass.  I think the conclusion nails it– the airline industry essentially stopped innovating in the 1960s.  Their basic corporate orientation is that their business is getting a plane from one place to another, where the passengers are incidental and could just as easily be cargo.  They need to think of themselves as a business for moving people from one place to another, where the plane is only an instrument.

Paul Krugman is Brilliant, but is He Meta-Rational? (Eli Dourado, Umlaut)

Why an MRI costs $1,080 in America and $280 in France (Ezra Klein, Wonkblog)– This is of a piece, if not derivative of, the long Brill piece I posted a couple of weeks ago.  The dirty secret: we will have to end up paying doctors and hospitals less for what they do (not to mention the drug and device companies).

Mormonism

Adjusting the Narrative: Introduction and Proposal (David Tayman, Worlds Without End)

‘We shall now call on some of our sisters’: LDS Women and General Conference Participation (JJohnson, Juvenile Instructor)

Revolutionary Sisterhood: The Struggle to Sustain a Prophetic Vision (Cheryl Bruno, Worlds without End)

The Neck that Turns the Head: Influence vs. Authority vs. Power (nat kelly, Feminist Mormon Housewives)

New Pope

Does the Pope Matter? (Garry Wills, NYRB)

Francis I, a Jesuit Pope (Clare Malone, The American Prospect)

‘Dirty War’ Questions for the New Pope (Robert Parry)

The Pope on the Bus (Andrew Sullivan, The Dish)

God is an Argentine (Martin Caparros, NYT)

How Rich is the Catholic Church? (Matthew Yglesias, Slate)– Though the LDS Church is organized more centrally (legally speaking) than the Catholic Church, its finances are still completely opaque, mostly because American law exempts all churches from any disclosure requirements.

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